Skip to Content

More than $1 million raised at 65th Annual Eagles Cancer Telethon

ROCHESTER, Minn. (KTTC) – More than $1 million was raised to fund cancer research at the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Hormel Institute-University of Minnesota, and the Masonic Cancer Center-University of Minnesota during the 65th Annual Eagles Cancer Telethon. It’s the longest running locally produced telethon in the United States.

The telethon runs for 20 hours straight, from 8 pm Saturday until 4 pm Sunday, at the Mayo Civic Center in downtown Rochester.

Since the telethon’s inception 65 years ago, nearly $17 million has been raised for cancer research.

The disease has interrupted the lives of 15 million in the United States. It does not discriminate and can come without warning. But for many who face the battle, there’s always a source of hope.

“Leaning into family and friends. That’s the bottom line,” said Chuck Sibley, the chief photographer at KTTC and skin cancer survivor.

Sibley joined more than a dozen others onstage during the Survivor’s Moment. A highlight of the telethon near the close of the telethon when cancer survivors hold signs with one word that has a special meaning to them. Some held signs that read, “hope,” “faith,” strength.”

“We hope that as survivors that we can give people who have cancer now hope,” said one cancer survivor.

Amanda Brandt is a colorectal cancer survivor. She stood next to her dad on stage who survived skin cancer. “It truly felt great, because people who haven’t gone through cancer don’t really know what it’s like. So having others up there that have gone through similar things that I did, it felt amazing to have us all come together as one,” said Brandt.

Cancer death rates are doing down. In this country, the overall cancer death rate has dropped 26 percent since the early 1990s. Additionally, nearly 2.5 million people have survived cancer since the early 1990s.

Each year, your donations are helping to save lives. The fight against cancer is a continuous battle. You can donate here at the Eagles Cancer Telethon.

Jon Okerstrom

Skip to content